Guitar Chords: What Is The Difference Between A MAJOR Chord And A MAJOR 7 Chord On Guitar?



Aula + cifra + tab em cifraclub.tv – Aula de guitarra da música “Highway To Hell”, do AC/DC. Apresentada por Patrick Blancos.

Comments

  1. Jason X says:
  2. Paulo M says:

    A major chord only includes the root, 3rd and 5th notes of the major scale, whereas a major 7 chord also includes the 7th note of the major scale.

  3. John H says:

    A major chord is the tonic, major third and major fifth. In C, that would be C E and G.

    A major seventh chord adds the major 7th. Again in C it would be C E G B

    Major sevenths will tend to sound off when compared to a basic major triad.

  4. Paul P says:

    Major has the root, 3rd and 5th. Major 7th also has the 7th.

    C chord: C E G
    C Maj7: C E G B

  5. choy_daniel says:

    Major Seventh (formally “major/major seventh”, also maj7, M7, Δ7, ⑦): root, major third, perfect fifth, major seventh. Major seventh chords are usually constructed on the first or fourth degree of a scale, (in C or G major: C-E-G-B). Due to the major seventh interval between the root and seventh (C-B, an inverted minor second), this chord can sometimes sound dissonant, depending on the voicing used. For example, Bacharach and David’s Raindrops Keep Fallin’ on My Head opens with a major chord followed by a major seventh in the next measure.

    A major chord is any chord which has a major third above its root, as opposed to a minor chord which has a minor third. More specifically, it is the three-note chord made up of a major third and perfect fifth above the root—if the root of the chord is C, the chord will consist of the notes C, E and G. This is also known as a major triad.

  6. Jeff J says:

    Generally speaking, a major chord is any chord which has a major third above its root, as opposed to a minor chord which has a minor third. More specifically, it is the three-note chord made up of a major third and perfect fifth above the root—if the root of the chord is C, the chord will consist of the notes C, E and G. This is also known as a major triad.

    A seventh chord is a chord consisting of a triad plus a note forming an interval of a seventh above the chord’s root. In its earliest usage, the seventh was introduced solely as an embellishing or nonchord tone. The seventh destabilized the triad, and allowed the composer to emphasize movement in a given direction. As time progressed and the collective ears of the western world became more accustomed to dissonance, the seventh was allowed to become a part of the chord itself, and in some modern music, and jazz in particular, nearly every chord is a seventh chord.

  7. david l says:

    Without getting technical with intervals or scales..your Major 7th chords are like stepping stones to other chords in a progression. Their used allot in Folk, Blues and Jazz for creating that anticipation between chords and fills. Your Major chords are fat and round, and are the building blocks on which to create different tonalities. You can add or remove notes to create other interesting diad and triad chords form them. Try substituting a Major chord for a major 7th in a progression and it will change the shape and direction of a song.